Trade Waiter – Trades I’m Looking Forward To

blackmagickBlack Magick

This is one of two Rucka books on this list. Haven’t heard a lot about this book, but since I finished Queen and Country, I pretty much try to check out everything he writes. How good is Queen and Country? You will not find a book that is better researched. It is a workplace drama that gets the details of the work dynamics perfectly.

What’s this book about? Magick maybe? African Americans? I’m not sure. I’m going in cold.

Saga

Every trade so far has been fantastic. There’s no reason to think that quality will stop with Volume 6. Read more

Low – Trade Waiter

low2-gregtocchiniLow inhabits a strange dark future. The world looks like a kind of inverted Mad Max, where the future is trapped underwater instead of stuck in the desert and, while the setting is specific and engaging, this is not a quiet atmosphere story.

The book plays at full volume and it’s more than worth listening to.

The emotional wallops hit like a hammer. Writer, Rick Remender is a student of the kill-your-darlings school of writing or at the very least the rip-out-their-eyeballs school. The book is dark, sexy and gross at times, maybe immature — but the stakes matter. It’s not wallowing in filth just for its own sake.

Tocchini’s art calls back to the classic 70s art style of sci-fi paperbacks, rendering underwater future babes and horrible sea monsters with aplomb. The art suggests more than it details. The style’s more painterly than what you might associate with a tech-heavy future and that keeps the art from being as accessible as a more traditional comic would be. But it’s that same strangeness that makes the art remarkable. Read more

Deadly Class – Trade Waiter

Wes Craig and Rick Remender’s Deadly Class features some of the most striking covers in comic shops right now. Just look at them:
Cover DClass Read more

In Real Life Review – Trade Waiter

Cover IRLThis graphic novel reminds us that the world is crawling with unsavory underground markets. People in the rich world sometimes feel uncomfortable about the existence these grey economies, but they rarely go out of their ways to do anything about them, not because they’re bad people, but because it can be hard to know the right thing to do. This issue sits at the heart of In Real Life.

Writer, Cory Doctorow, and artist, Jen Wang’s, story concerns a middle school gamer girl, who’s a powerful fighter and a skilled player in a male-dominated world of massive multiplayer games. The hero, named Anda, in an oblique reference to Ender’s Game, discovers gold farmers (players employed to acquire and sell in-game items) who she sees destroying the economy of the game. Anda gleefully begins to taking these farmers out and to collect real cash bounties. The moral quandary comes out when she realizes that these gold farmers are people in poor countries who depend on farming for their livelihoods. Read more